FOCUSED REPORT

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

Commission on Colleges

August 19, 2011


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Core Requirements

 

2.8 Faculty 

2.10 Student support services 

 

Comprehensive Standards

 

3.2 Governance and Administration

3.2.3 Board conflict of interest

3.2.10 Administrative staff evaluations

3.2.12 Fund-raising activities 

3.2.13 Institution-related foundations

3.3 Institutional Effectiveness

3.3.1 Institutional effectiveness

3.4 Educational Programs

3.4.4 Acceptance of academic credit

3.4.9 Academic support services

3.4.11 Academic program coordination

3.5 Educational Programs: Undergraduate Programs

3.5.1 College-level competencies 

3.5.3 Undergraduate program requirements

3.7 Faculty

3.7.1 Faculty competence

3.7.2 Faculty evaluation

3.9 Student Affairs and Services

3.9.3 Qualified staff

Federal Requirements

 

4.6 Recruitment materials

 


2.8       Faculty

 

The number of full-time faculty members is adequate to support the mission of the institution and to ensure the quality and integrity of its academic programs. 

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution offers courses for programs of study in three locations (Decatur, Huntsville, and Limestone Correctional Facility) as well as dual enrollment in 71 local high schools.  Students cannot obtain more than 50 percent of any certificate or degree program at their respective high schools.  Two Emergency Medical Services courses that lead to a Workforce Development Certificate are offered at the Huntsville Emergency Medical Services, Inc. facility. 

 

The institution offers 50% or more of a number of Associate of Science degrees via distance education.  In addition, students may complete 33-51 percent of a number of Associate of Applied Science degree offerings online. 

 

Faculty load and class size data indicate a commitment to low student-to-faculty ratios as a method of ensuring quality in the academic programs offered.  However, there is insufficient information to determine if the Huntsville location has sufficient full-time faculty to ensure the quality and integrity of each academic program.  The full- to part-time ratio at the Huntsville Campus is 30 percent to 70 percent, and this ratio is not disaggregated by program. 

 

While the institution is to be commended for its commitment to small class size, the Offsite Reaffirmation Committee expressed concern with the low percentage of credit hours taught by full-time faculty in the areas of Mathematics (37%), Social Science (31%), and Fine Arts (40%).  The institution provided insufficient information to determine if the number of full-time faculty in these academic programs is adequate to support the mission of the institution and to ensure the quality and integrity of these academic programs. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College’s mission to provide quality, innovative instruction and promote community development and cultural enrichment is primarily accomplished by having an adequate number of full-time faculty members. The College currently employs 135 full-time faculty members who ensure the quality and integrity of its academic programs through innovative teaching, class preparation, office hours, curriculum development, and program review. During the 2010-11 year, 50.3 percent of the total credit hours were taught by full-time faculty members. The lowest percentage was at the Huntsville Campus, with 30 percent being taught by full-time faculty.  Nationally, full-time faculty compose 32.8 percent of the faculty at two-year institutions (Source:  IPEDS, Winter 2007-08; Human Resources Component, Fall Staff Section). The 30 percent is only slightly below the national average of 32.8 percent.

Although the 2010-11 Campus Breakdown of Credit Hours by Department shows several programs at the Huntsville campus with lower percentages of credit hours taught by full-time faculty, the College believes that the number of full-time faculty members is adequate to not only support the mission, but to ensure the quality and integrity of it academic programs based on the teaching responsibilities of the faculty, class size, student satisfaction with the quality of instruction, program accreditations, quality of adjunct instructors, and the support for adjuncts. Staffing changes occurring in Huntsville are discussed later in the narrative. 

 

The 2010-11 breakdown of credit hours by program shows six programs with the percentage of credit hours taught by full-time faculty that are below the overall average of 50.3 percent. These programs include fire science (0%), social science (33%), fine arts (36%), mathematics (37%), air conditioning and refrigeration (44%), and process technology (0%). The College has added three new faculty members in the social sciences and one in mathematics. This will increase the credit hours taught by full-time faculty in those areas. However, only two programs are below the national average of 32.8 percent.

 

·       Fire science is a short certificate program with only 105 credit hours produced. The College employs one adjunct instructor who has 25+ years experience as a fire fighter and numerous professional certifications. He also serves as assistant chief for a local fire department. The College has had no certificate completers in the past three years.

 

·       Process technology also has relatively small numbers of credit hours.  The College regularly uses several highly qualified adjunct instructors. For example, one has a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering with 39 years experience as a senior engineer and process specialist. The College also employs a full-time lab assistant who supports all technology programs.

 

Teaching Responsibilities. Full-time instructors work at least 35 hours per week teaching 15 to 16 credit hours for the fall and spring semesters, or the equivalent as determined by the President. A technical or an allied health instructor should not exceed more than 30 contact hours per week. Some faculty members have release time for non-teaching assignments such as Lead Faculty, distance learning, and club sponsor. Instructors may also teach one class overload or up to 15 additional contact hours for health and technical instructors. These policies are outlined in the Personnel Handbook and are aligned with State Board Policies 608.01, 608.02, and 608.03. In addition to teaching, full-time faculty participate in college committees, professional development activities, curriculum development, and/or community service. While full-time faculty may informally assist or advise students, the College has Advising Centers located on the Decatur and Huntsville campuses with responsibility for academic advising and program scheduling assistance for students.

 

Class size. Calhoun understands that interaction with an instructor is important to student success. In the 2010 Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) results, 55.9 percent of Calhoun students indicated that they “often” or “very often” used email to communicate with an instructor. This was slightly above the cohort of 54.3 percent and Large Colleges group of 54.4 percent. The percentage of Calhoun students who received prompt feedback (written or oral) from instructors was 56.5 percent compared to Large Colleges group of 55.8 percent.  One way to ensure this type of interaction is to limit class size. The College has established maximum limits for each course based on input from instructors. For example, the College limits many art courses to 25 students. Music performance courses are limited to 10. Social science courses have a maximum limit of 40, which is the largest limit for the College. During the fall semester 2010, Calhoun had an average class size of 26.8. Keeping class sizes smaller makes it necessary to teach more sections. Teaching more sections requires an additional need for instructors, both full- and part-time. During Fall Semester 2010, Calhoun offered 153 sections of history, psychology, and religion. Almost all of those classes had the maximum number of students (40).  Had the College chosen to raise the maximum number of students to 60 in these classes, the number of sections would have been reduced from 153 to 102, eliminating the need for 15 part-time faculty members, thus increasing the percentage taught by full-time faculty.

 

Student Satisfaction. The College administers a Student Satisfaction Survey, the Collegiate Accountability Performance Profile (CAPP) each spring to a random sampling of classes. The results over the last three years indicate that the majority of the students either “agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement “Overall, I am Satisfied with the Quality of Instruction.” Specific percentages are included in the table below.

 

CAPP Results Regarding Quality of Instruction

Year

Total College

Percentages

Huntsville Percentages

2008

84%

90%

2009

90%

93%

2010

95%

97%

 

Even though the percentage of credit hours taught by full-time faculty members at the Huntsville campus is lower than the overall percentage, the students are very satisfied regarding the quality of instruction, even exceeding that of the college.

 

Accreditation. Calhoun has ten nationally-accredited programs. For example, the dental assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association. With the exception of Emergency Medical Services (EMS), no accrediting body has identified the number of faculty members as inadequate. The following recommendation occurred in the exit report from the EMS site visit in July 2008:

 

Statement from EMS site reviewers - "At the time of the self study, faculty numbers appeared to be adequate or even generous for student and class load.  However, although class and student numbers have significantly increased for the past 3 years, additional faculty have not been hired. We are concerned that the quality of the program will diminish or the current faculty will burn out without additional help soon. Additionally, administrative release is not provided for program director which compounds the problem. We feel additional faculty is necessary to maintain program quality."

 

The additional full-time faculty members were added in September 2008 and no additional faculty issues have been identified.

 

Quality of Adjunct Faculty.  Calhoun Community College academic leaders work very hard to find competent, qualified adjunct faculty.  During Fall Semesters 2009 and 2010, 11.3 percent and 10.2 percent respectively, of all adjunct instructors held a doctorate degree. Additionally, many part-time faculty members are also employed at one of the six regionally-accredited four-year institutions in the area. Based on the 2000 Census Data, 11.6 percent of the population of Madison County (the third largest in Alabama) held a master’s degree or higher with another 22.7 percent having earned a bachelor’s degree.  This provides access to highly qualified adjunct faculty members. NASA and other government jobs provide access to a high concentration of scientists and engineers. The College chooses to employee more adjunct instructors in certain areas because of their real-world experience. Their work experiences — especially in science and mathematics — allow them to provide more specific, contextual examples to facilitate student learning of concepts.  Four specific examples of quality adjunct instructors are included for review.

 

Support for Adjunct Faculty.  At the beginning of each fall semester, the College provides a 2.5 hour workshop where adjunct instructors meet with discipline-specific full-time faculty to discuss expectations, potential problems, and teaching methodology. Approximately 350 full- and part-time faculty, staff, and administrators attended the August 17, 2010 workshop.  Information regarding semester procedures, distance learning, library services, FERPA policies and procedures, tutoring programs, and WebAdvisor were provided on a jump drive to all adjunct instructors.  Workshops are also offered throughout the year on classroom technology such as Blackboard and WebAdvisor. Department Chairs are full-time faculty members assigned to “mentor” adjuncts and address any issues/problems they may have. The College also has standardized syllabi for all classes, whether they are taught by full- and part-time faculty.  Examples of standardized syllabi are provided in Psychology 200, History 201, and Math 112.

 

Huntsville Campus Changes. The percentage of credit hours taught by full-time faculty is lower at the Huntsville campus than other locations due to a federal court order, unanticipated enrollment growth, and reduced state funding. A federal court order from the 1980s through the fall term of 2006 limited the number of full-time equivalency students that could be taught; severely restricted day offerings to the times of 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and after 4:00 p.m.; and required that most business courses be taught by faculty from Alabama A & M University. As a result of the court order release, enrollment at the Huntsville campus increased 49 percent from Fall Semester 2007 to Fall Semester 2010, exceeding all expectations.  To accommodate this enormous growth, the College has added a significant number of full-time faculty.  Additionally, College data indicate many instructors teach at both the Decatur and Huntsville campuses or Huntsville and online classes.  During 2009-10, the College had 20 full-time employees at the Huntsville campus and 8 teaching on both the Decatur and Huntsville campuses. During 2010-11, the number of full-time faculty teaching at Huntsville increased to 23 with 12 teaching at both campuses. For 2011-12, Calhoun has hired six full-time faculty members to teach at the Huntsville campus. These positions include history (2), computer science, psychology, English, and science. Moreover, one sociology, one criminal justice, one psychology, one science, and ½ of math instructor have been moved to the Huntsville campus. The 49 percent growth has made it very difficult to anticipate the exact need in terms new faculty positions. Moreover, a loss of about $7 million for each of the past three years has greatly impacted the ability to add full-time positions.

 

With 50.3 percent of the credit hour production produced by full-time faculty members, the College believes that the number of full-time faculty members is adequate to not only support the mission, but to also ensure the quality and integrity of it academic programs. Even though the Huntsville campus has a lower percentage (30 percent) of credit hours taught by full-time faculty, the number is only slightly below the national average of 32.8 percent. The College has also added six full-time faculty and moved four from Decatur to the Huntsville campus, which should improve the credit hour percentages of full-time faculty. Criminal justice at Huntsville had 20 percent of the credit hours taught by full-time faculty. With only 723 total credits, the addition should increase that number. Social science had 27 percent of the credits at Huntsville taught by full-time faculty. The addition of three faculty and one moving from being based in Decatur to being based in Huntsville should significantly improve the percentage.  Language and Literature (33%) is increasing by one full-time faculty member; Science (37%) is increasing by one full-time faculty and another full-time faculty member moving from Decatur to Huntsville; and Math (25%) will increase by ½ of a full-time position.  These additions and transfers from Decatur will increase not only the overall percentage, but also each program’s percentages.  

 

The combined documentation of the teaching responsibilities of the full-time faculty, small class sizes, student satisfaction with the quality of instruction, nationally-recognized program accreditations, quality of adjunct faculty, and the support for adjunct faculty demonstrate that the number of full-time faculty members is adequate to support the College’s mission and to ensure the quality and integrity of its academic programs.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Core Requirement 2.8.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

Mission Statement

2.

Breakdown of Credit Hours by Campus

3.

Breakdown of Credit Hours by Program

4.

Personnel Handbook

5.

State Board Policy 608.01

6.

State Board Policy 608.02

7.

State Board Policy 608.03

8.

2008 CAPP Results Regarding Quality of Instruction

9.

2009 CAPP Results Regarding Quality of Instruction

10.

2010 CAPP Results Regarding Quality of Instruction

11.

Specific examples of Quality Adjuncts

12.

August 17, 2011 Adjunct Faculty Workshop Agenda

 

Examples of information shared with adjuncts and loaded to a flash drive for easy access by the adjunct faculty members include:

 

§  Semester procedures

§  Distance learning

§  Library services

§  FERPA Policies and procedures

§  Tutoring programs

§  WebAdvisor

 

13.

Standardized Syllabus for Psychology 200

14.

Standardized Syllabus for History 201

15.

Standardized Syllabus for Math 112


2.10     Student Support Services

 

The institution provides student support programs, services, and activities consistent with its mission that promote student learning and enhance the development of its students. 

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution offers a variety of student support programs, services, and activities to promote student learning.  The website and course schedule are the primary vehicles used to inform students of available services.  New Student Orientation courses are used to distribute valuable information about services to new and transfer students.

 

Learning labs are established on both campuses to offer personal assistance.  Tutoring is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week via SmarThinking – an online tutorial service.  Student Services employees are deployed to both campuses.  Approximately 20 clubs and organizations are offered to the student body.  Men’s baseball, women’s softball, and intramural athletics are provided.  A wide variety of activities for students are planned each semester.  The library and library website provide students with access to an extensive collection of books, reference materials, and journals. 

 

The institution offers support for minority, international, displaced homemakers, single parent, and disabled students through the Multicultural Student Affairs Office and the ADA Office.  A TRIO Emerging Scholars Program is in place to increase the persistence of first-generation, low income and/or disabled students.  Free tutoring, advising, workshops, and referrals are made available to students via the institution’s ROADS Program.  Students assess the services and programs using CCSSE and CAPP.  Survey results reflect student satisfaction with activities and services.

 

Although the institution provides a wide array of services for students at both the Huntsville and Decatur campuses, little information was provided regarding the student support services available to distance learning students.  No mention was made, for example, of how key components such as orientation and advising services are provided to distance learning students. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College recognizes the importance of providing student support services for online students.  Enrollment in online classes has grown significantly in recent years, and the College has been proactive in providing access to a variety of resources and services.  The College provides remote access to the entire range of online services through student authentication and posts instructions for students on the College’s website.  Individuals having difficulty with browser setup or other technology related issue can contact the IT help desk via email (DL@calhoun.edu) or telephone (256-306-2700) for assistance.  Students register for classes using WebAdvisor and are also able to view/print schedules, check grades, view/print student transcripts, search for classes, pay tuition and fees, update their addresses, and request transcript and enrollment verification services. The College Catalog, course schedules, specific program requirements, and other information are also available through the website.

 

Admissions and Records

Students who are not able to come to campus may complete an online application through the College’s website.  The online link for future and new students serves as a directory for Frequently Asked Questions, Campus Contacts, and other helpful assistance for prospective students.  All students use the self-service web registration system, and registration information is also published early online to provide up-to-date class schedules and accurate information on class availability.

 

Advising Centers

Advising Center personnel assist students in selecting classes, planning schedules and programs of study, and registering for classes.  Advising personnel answer simple questions about enrollment through Facebook, which is monitored daily.  Updates, which include enrollment topics, transfer procedures, and career service announcements are released periodically to students' Calhoun email accounts.

 

In addition, by request, advisors are able to conduct an advising session online through software called GoToMeeting.  Students schedule appointments either by phone or through email and send personal information (i.e., transcripts, student ID#, and test scores) to the advisor prior to the online appointment.  The advisor uses the information provided to conduct an appropriate advising session.  After the session, a follow-up email is sent directly to each student.  Sessions have been conducted with students all over the world, including Korea and Spain, using this method.

 

Other advising services provided online include the Advising Online Series of webinars hosted by an academic advisor.  These webinars detail different academic programs on campus.  Through the Advising Online Series offered with GoToMeeting software, students are able to register online and participate in a real-time group advising session.  This outreach allows the College to advise a large group of students, including distance learning students, who cannot come to campus.  The latest Advising Online Series was conducted May 2011 for Nursing and had 117 student registrants.  

 

Information about advising for online students who cannot access traditional advising services can be accessed on the College’s website under “Directions on how to schedule non-traditional/distance education advising services.”

 

Orientation Classes

Orientation classes are designed to provide entering students with additional information about the College.  Orientation is offered in many formats each semester, including 3-day mini-sessions, seven-week minimesters, and web-based courses.  Distance learning students who cannot come to campus take the course online.  The course content is delivered through Blackboard.

 

Financial Aid

Financial assistance is made available through federal, state, institutional and third-party aid, including grants, student loans, scholarships, and work-study.  The Student Financial Services Office maintains a highly visible and fully functional website 24-hours a day to provide online financial aid and scholarship information and forms to enable students to sign promissory notes and complete scholarship applications.  Students who are selected for verification may mail additional documentation to the Financial Aid Office. The Financial Aid Office also has a Facebook page which provides additional information to students.

 

Career Services Center

The Career Services Center provides career information for all interested community members and Calhoun students. This information includes career interest inventories, career guidance, career information, educational information, and job search skills information.  Also available is ACT’s Discover, a computerized system which provides information about career and educational opportunities.  For example, students in search of jobs may check out the local job listings by logging into their Calhoun (S.P.A.C.E.) email account.  Job listings are found in the “Job Announcements” folder.  Once a student has logged into his/her email account, he/she is able to click on “Student Announcements” and then “Job Announcements.”  The announcement includes referral instructions for those students who wish to apply. 

 

Library

The Library maintains a webpage dedicated to Distance Learning Students.  The webpage provides general information, along with a link to electronic resources. More than 53,000 NetLibrary eBooks offer full-text books to students who create a free account using a Calhoun networked computer.  Students, including distance learning, also have access the 46,000+ electronic book collection, more than 40 Alabama Virtual Library licensed online databases, and selected online databases licensed through the Library Website.  An online reference collection of 500+ titles is currently being implemented. A Virtual Reference Desk offers web based dictionaries, handbooks, encyclopedias, and directories.

 

ADA/Services for Special Student Populations

The ADA office maintains a web page that is available to students 24-hours/day.  Students needing accommodations can communicate with the office via phone, email, or mail.

 

Tutoring

Calhoun Community College provides programs and services to assist students in obtaining and reaching their academic goals. Tutorial services are available 24 hours/day, 7 days per week through SmarThinking, an online tutorial service.  Links to SmarThinking are available in Blackboard and are placed there by the instructor of the course.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Core Requirement 2.10.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.      

Distance Learning website

2.      

WebAdvisor

3.      

Link to Online Application

4.      

Online link for future and new students

5.      

Frequently Asked Questions

6.      

Online listing of Campus Contacts

7.      

Self-Service Web Registration

8.      

Advising Center Facebook Page

9.      

GoToMeeting PowerPoint for Nursing Advising Online Series

10.   

Nursing Advising Online Series Registration Confirmation

11.   

Financial Aid website

12.   

Financial Aid Facebook Page

13.   

Career Services Center

14.   

ACT’s Discover Webpage

15.   

S.P.A.C.E. Student Email Accounts

16.   

Job Announcements

17.   

Library Link for Distance Learning Students

18.   

ADA office

19.   

SmarThinking Tutoring Software

 


3.2.3    Board conflict of interest

 

The board has a policy addressing conflict of interest for its members.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

Code of Alabama Section 36-25-5 prohibits personal gain for any trustee or any member of his/her family because of their official position on the State Board of Education.  The stated Code section clearly defines when a conflict of interest exists for a trustee.  Further, the cited State Board Policy addresses and discourages the receipt of gifts and other items of value by trustees.  However, the institution did not provide evidence of whether this policy has been used. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Code of Alabama Section 36-25-5 states that no public official or public employee shall use or cause to be used his or her official position or office to obtain personal gain for himself or herself, or family member of the public employee or family member of the public official, or any business with which the person is associated unless the use and gain are otherwise specifically authorized by law.  The code specifically states that conflict of interest exists when a member of a legislative body, public official or public employee has a substantial financial interest by reason of ownership of, control of, or the exercise of power over any interest greater than five percent of the value of any corporation, company, association, or firm, partnership, proprietorship, or any other business entity of any kind or character which is uniquely affected by proposed or pending legislation; or who is an officer or director for any such corporation, company, association, or firm, partnership, proprietorship, or any other business entity of any kind or character which is uniquely affected by proposed or pending legislation.

 

Additionally, State Board Policy 111.01 strongly discourages the presentation of gifts, services, transportation, food, entertainment or things of value to its members.

 

NOTE:  Calhoun Community College has never had cause to evoke this policy.  In addition, the College researched State of Alabama records and found no evidence that any Alabama State Board of Education member has ever been impeached or removed from office.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.2.3.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

Code of Alabama Section 36-25-5

2.

State Board Policy 111.01

 


3.2.10  Administrative staff evaluations

 

The institution evaluates the effectiveness of its administrators on a periodic basis.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

Administrative staff members are evaluated on an annual basis in accordance with State Board Policy 607.01.  The evaluation process is documented in the Personnel Handbook and includes a self-evaluation.  While the institution provided one completed annual evaluation for an administrator in a supervisor role, this was not a representative sample.

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College recognizes the importance of regular evaluations of all employees and is pleased to provide additional documentation in compliance of Comprehensive Standard 3.2.10.  Completed evaluations for 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 for the following key administrative positions at the College are provided for review: 

 

·       Vice President of Instruction and Student Success

·       Dean of Planning, Research and Grants

·       Dean of Research Park/Director of Development

·       Assistant to the President for Public Relations, Community Affairs and Special Events

·       Dean of Student Affairs

·       Dean of Health Sciences

·       Dean of Humanities

·       Dean of Business, Applied Technologies and Workforce Development

·       Head Librarian

·       Coordinator of Evening Program

·       Director of Information Technologies

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.2.10.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

Evaluation Example – Vice President of Instruction & Student Success

2.

Evaluation Example – Dean of Planning, Research & Grants

3.

Evaluation Example – Dean of Research Park/Director of Development

4.

Evaluation Example - Assistant to the President for Public Relations, Community Affairs, and Special Events

5.

Evaluation Example – Dean of Student Affairs

6.

Evaluation Example – Dean of Health Sciences

7.

Evaluation Example – Dean of Humanities

8.

Evaluation Example – Dean of Business, Applied Technologies & Workforce Development

9.

Evaluation Example – Head Librarian

10.

Evaluation Example – Coordinator of Evening Program

11.

Evaluation Example – Director of Information Technologies

 


3.2.12  Fundraising activities

 

The institution’s chief executive officer controls the institution’s fundraising activities exclusive of institution-related foundations that are independent and separately incorporated.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

Alabama State Board Policy 315.01 authorizes the president to accept donations and gifts to the institution and to use these gifts for the purposes designated as long as the purposes are in keeping with the philosophy of the institution and the policies and general guidelines of the State Board of Education.  The institution employs a Director of Development who serves as the Director of the Foundation.  In addition, the Development Office Secretary serves as the Foundation Secretary. 

 

The institution provided its policy that authorizes the president to accept donations and gifts and that there is a development foundation established to support the institution.  There is, however, no evidence that the chief executive officer controls the institution’s fund-raising activities exclusive of institution-related foundations that are independent and separately incorporated. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College is a member of the Alabama Community College System (ACCS) which operates under the authority of the Alabama State Board of Education upon recommendations from the Chancellor who serves as Chief Executive Officer of the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education.  State Board Policy 315.01 authorizes Alabama State Board of Education members, Presidents and the Chancellor of the Alabama Community College System to accept gifts and donations for its colleges, and State Board Policy 315.02 prohibits the acceptance of any gift to benefit a Board member, employee of the college system, or a vendor of the college system.

 

The President of the College controls the institution’s fundraising activities exclusive of the Calhoun Community College Foundation and formally approves the acceptance or denial of all gifts and donations directly to the College.  Gifts or donations to the College are recorded by the College Business Office using the Request for Approval to Receive an In-Kind or Cash Donation.  The form requires the signature of the President who approves or denies the donation. The College recently received an equipment donation from a local television station valued at $12,500.  The Request for Approval to Receive an In-Kind or Cash Donation Form approved by the President for this donation is provided as evidence of compliance.  The College Business Office maintains a file of all contributions to the College and submits an annual report to the Chancellor who requests the report at the end of each fiscal year.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.2.12.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.       

State Board Policy 315.01

2.       

State Board Policy 315.02

3.       

Request for Approval to Receive an In-Kind or Cash Donation

4.       

Recent Example of Signed Request for Approval to Receive an In-Kind or Cash Donation

5.       

2009-10 Annual Report of Gifts and Bequests

6.       

Memo from Chancellor Requesting Annual Report

 


3.2.13  Institution-related foundations

 

Any institution-related foundation not controlled by the institution has a contractual or other formal agreement that (1) accurately describes the relationship between the institution and the foundation and (2) describes any liability associated with that relationship.  In all cases, the institution ensures that the relationship is consistent with its mission.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution receives support from the John C. Calhoun State Community College Foundation, Inc., a separately organized 501(c)(3) organization whose purpose is to raise, manage, distribute, and steward private resources to support the mission of the institution.  An operational agreement between the institution and Foundation clearly outlines responsibilities for both the institution and the Foundation and describes the relationship between the two entities. 

 

The institution demonstrated with Bylaws and agreements the relationship between the institution and the Foundation.  Although the institution provided a copy of the Articles of Incorporation for the Foundation, the copy provided was illegible.  The exact nature of any liability associated with the institution and Foundation was not clear from the evidence provided. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

The Calhoun Community College Foundation Board is liable for its own actions and operations, and this responsibility is laid out in the Agreement between Calhoun Community College Foundation and Calhoun Community College.  Due to the concern expressed by the Off-Site Committee, the College Foundation Board of Directors approved the addition of the following statement to the Agreement on July 5, 2011:

 

“In its capacity as a separately incorporated entity from Calhoun Community College, the Calhoun Community College Foundation agrees to indemnify and hold the College harmless from all claims of property damage or loss, and all claims of personal or financial injury to any person or organization that arise directly from the Foundation’s conduct of the activities outlined in this Agreement.”

 

The revised Agreement Between Calhoun Community College Foundation and Calhoun Community College is provided as evidence of compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.2.13.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.2.3.

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.       

Revised Agreement Between Calhoun Community College Foundation and Calhoun Community College

 


3.3.1    Institutional Effectiveness

 

The institution identifies expected outcomes, assesses the extent to which it achieves these outcomes, and provides evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results in each of the following areas:

 

   3.3.1.1                      educational programs to include student learning outcomes

   3.3.1.2                      administrative support services

   3.3.1.3                      educational support services

   3.3.1.4                      research within its educational mission, if appropriate

   3.3.1.5                      community/public service within its educational mission, if appropriate.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

Although the institution has clearly devoted considerable resources to assessment activities, including a comprehensive program review process, the documentation presented was uniformly incomplete or lacked the information needed to support and demonstrate the ways in which the institution is assessing its effectiveness.  Although the members of the Off-Site Reaffirmation Committee diligently searched the compliance report for supporting evidence not linked to corresponding Core Requirements, Comprehensive Standards, and Federal Requirements, the consistent use of blank or incomplete forms coupled with a dearth of documentation such as samples of completed forms or meeting minutes severely hindered the Committee’s ability to determine institutional compliance.  The Committee was also hindered by its ability to establish compliance by the small number of samples provided, and by ambiguous naming protocols used.  The list of academic and administrative planning units provided by the institution, for example, lists “Grants” as both an educational support and community/public service unit.  In addition, the sample planning unit for the administrative support service unit was labeled, “Planning, Research, and Grants.” The Committee had no way of knowing if the institution actually has three planning units for grants or if the list of academic and administrative planning units is inaccurate.  The institution should provide an accurate list of academic and administrative planning units.  In addition, the institution should provide a sufficient number of samples to determine compliance, and should make the case that the number of samples provided is representative of its educational programs, administrative support, educational support, and community/public service planning units. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College recognizes the frustration of the Off-Site Team in reviewing and/or locating appropriate documents to support compliance of this Comprehensive Standard and regrets any inconvenience caused by the obvious lack of appropriate documentation.  The following narrative and supporting evidence provides a concise overview of the institutional effectiveness and assessment processes in place at the College.

 

3.3.1.1  INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS – STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution identifies 39 separate academic units in its three-year review cycle that originate from four divisions.  The three educational planning unit examples provided, Clinical Laboratory Technology, Emergency Medical Services, and Cosmetology Nail Technology, clearly do not adequately represent the institution’s educational programs, either in terms of the number of samples provided or in the variety of educational units across divisions.  In addition, while the samples provided included program outcomes such as retention and certification success, none included student learning outcomes describing what students will accomplish, or do as a result of participating or completing these programs.  The curriculum review process does not suffice as an official program review as there is no collection and analyses of data regarding student learning outcomes.

 

Although the institution cited many examples of improvement of educational programs, the institution failed to establish the correlation between these improvements and predetermined outcomes, assessment tools, and results.  The institution also failed to address assessment of distance education. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

The academic planning units identified by the College include areas that support the Associate of Science (A.S.) Degree in General Studies and Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees in a range of topics. 

 

Under the College’s former system of evaluation, each A.A.S degree program completed a program review template on a three-year rotating cycle.  The template contained information on occupational demand, Advisory Board members, enrollment/graduation rates, licensure rates, financial information, measurable program outcomes and an opportunity to document related actions. 

 

The Academic Program Review process was revised in summer 2011 to reflect student learning outcomes and data-based improvements.  Under the revised system of evaluation, each A.A.S. degree program is required to list student learning outcomes within the program.  The current system was implemented summer 2011 and a representative sample of A.A.S. programs from three of the College’s four instructional units is provided for review.  Note:  There are no A.A.S. degrees offered under the Math/Science Division.

 

Instructional Unit

Program

BUS/CIS/Technologies

Business Administration (Bus Adm option)

Business Administration (Paralegal option)

Design Drafting

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

Barbering

Prison Education Program

 

Health

Surgical Technology

Physical Therapist Assistant

 

Humanities and Social Science

Child Development

Computer Graphics

 

 

The Office of Planning, Research and Grants prepares the Educational Program Review for the A.S. degree program in general education each year in early summer.  The program review contains the measurable goals of the transfer degree program.  The first A.S. Degree Program Review was completed in 2009 when the College determined the need to offer only one A.S. degree in general education.  Strengths of the A.S. Degree Program identified in the 2009 Program Review include:

 

§  Favorable success rates after transferring to four-year institution

§  Increasing numbers of transfer students

§  Increasing retention rates within the A.S. major

 

Weaknesses of the A.S. Degree Program and plans to improve identified in the 2009 Program Review include:

Weakness

Plans to Improve

Low graduation rate

Retention Task Force is addressing through regular meetings

 

Lower than national norm on CAAP

 

 

Academic Deans are addressing with faculty in their respective areas

 

3.3.1.2  INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS - ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SERVICES

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution began assessing administrative support services with an Administrate Program Review (APR) planning tool in March 2009.  Prior to March 2009, the institution used a Measure of Student Success (MOSS) to establish and measure goals.  The institution identifies nine administrative support planning units and provided documentation for only one unit.  The documentation for this unit included a MOSS assessment plan for the 2006-2007 academic year and an Administrative Program Review form for the current academic year.  In the single-sample provided, the unit failed to indicate the extent to which outcomes were met on either the MOSS or APR.  In addition, the institution failed to provide evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results for this unit on either the MOSS or APR.  Although the institution cited a number of improvements in administrative areas, no correlation was made between these improvements and predetermined outcomes. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

The Administrative Support Services units identified by the College include:

 

·       Maintenance

·       Public Safety

·       Business Office (including Payroll and Mail Services)

·       Human Resources

·       Public Relations

·       Information Technologies

·       Office of the Vice President of Instruction and Student Success

·       Office of the President

·       Huntsville Campus

Beginning Summer 2011, each of these units was required to complete a template to document improvements in their respective areas.  A representative sample of those reviews is provided in compliance of Comprehensive Standard 3.3.1.2:

 

·       Public Relations

·       Maintenance

·       Human Resources

 

3.3.1.3  INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS – EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE RESPONSE

 

The institution identifies 12 educational support planning units and provided evidence of a completed Administrative Program Review (APR) for a single unit for the 2009-2010 academic year.  While the APR provided for this unit is complete, thus demonstrating the extent to which outcomes were met (Analysis of Goal), and evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results (Action Resulting from Analysis) a single example was insufficient.

 

Once again, the institution provided a list of improvements in the area of educational support, but failed to explain the linkage of this list to the assessment process.  The institution has clearly invested in tools to assess educational support services, and the use of assessment data from the Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE) is central to recent improvements at Calhoun. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

The Educational Support Services units identified by the College include:

 

·       Financial Aid

·       Planning, Research and Grants (Note: The Office of Planning and Research was combined with the Grants Office in April 2010)

·       Enrollment Management

o   Admissions

o   Advising and Career Services

·       Student Affairs

o   Athletics

o   Student Activities

o   Services to Special Populations

o   Student Support Services (Federal TRIO Grant)

o   Upward Bound (Federal TRIO Grant)

·       Testing Center

·                 Library

 

Numerous improvements in educational support services for traditional and distance education students have been implemented since the last Reaffirmation visit in 2001 including:

 

  Implemented online attendance software

  Implemented online tutoring services through SmarThinking

  Completed wireless network on Decatur and Huntsville campuses

  Increased Distance Education offerings by 40 percent with 91 courses offered in Distance Education format Fall 2010

  Hired Career Coaches to increase career awareness in local high schools

  Implemented the Horizon Library System to assist students conducting research

  Developed ONE Online Scholarship Application for all scholarships

  Established Student Email System with course conferences available

 

Beginning Summer 2011, each of these units was required to complete a template to document improvements in their respective areas.  A representative sample of those reviews is provided in compliance of Comprehensive Standard 3.3.1.3:

 

·       Library

·       Testing Center

·       Financial Aid

·       Enrollment Management

·       Planning, Research and Grants

 

3.3.1.5  INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS – COMMUNITY/PUBLIC SERVICE

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution identifies three planning units in the area of community/public service and provided a 2010-2011 Administrative Program Review sample for one unit.  Since the sample is for the current academic year, the document lacks assessment data that describes the extent to which the unit’s outcomes have been achieved, as well as evidence of improvement based on analysis of the results.  Although the institution uses assessment activities such as evaluations and client satisfaction surveys to measure the effectiveness of its community and public service units, the institution failed to link the assessment instruments discussed to unit outcomes or objectives. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Three units comprise the Community/Public Service areas identified by the College include Development/Foundation, Continuing Education, and Business/Industry Services.

 

Community service is a critical piece of Calhoun Community College’s mission and is one of the College’s Core Indicators.  Calhoun is truly a community college providing workforce training to new and existing businesses, continuing education courses for professional and personal growth, and participating in community service projects. 

 

Beginning summer 2011, each of these units was required to complete a template to document improvements in their respective areas.  Reviews are provided for all three units in compliance of Comprehensive Standard 3.3.1.5:

 

·       Development/Foundation

·       Continuing Education

·       Business/Industry Services (Workforce Solutions)

 

Since receiving the Off-Site Team’s Report, Calhoun Community College has made every effort to become compliant in Comprehensive Standard 3.3.1.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.       

Academic Planning Units

2.       

Old Program Review Template

3.       

New Program Review Template

4.       

Business Administration (Bus Adm option)

5.       

Business Administration (Paralegal option)

6.       

Design Drafting

7.       

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

8.       

Barbering

9.       

Prison Education Program

10.    

Surgical Technology

11.    

Physical Therapist Assistant

12.    

Child Development

13.    

Computer Graphics

14.    

A.S. Degree Program Review (2009)

15.    

Public Relations

16.    

Maintenance

17.    

Human Resources

18.    

Library

19.    

Testing Center

20.    

Financial Aid

21.    

Enrollment Management

22.    

Planning, Research and Grants

23.    

Mission

24.    

Core Indicators

25.    

Development/Foundation Program Review

26.    

Continuing Education Program Review

27.    

Business/Industry Services (Workforce Solutions) Program Review

 


3.4.4    Acceptance of academic credit

The institution has a defined and published policy for evaluating, awarding and accepting credit for transfer, experiential learning, advanced placement, and professional certificates that is consistent with its mission and ensures that coursework and learning outcomes are at the collegiate level and comparable to the institution’s own degree programs.  The institution assumes responsibility for the academic quality of any coursework or credit recorded on the institution’s transcript.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution has a well-defined policy for evaluating, awarding, and accepting transfer credits for experiential learning, advanced placement, and professional certificates consistent with the learning outcomes of its programs.  State Board Policy 706.01 specifies that institutions must explain how they will accept credit for nontraditional means.  Guidelines for the acceptance of academic credit are detailed in the Catalog with specific information that addresses international students, credit by transfer, credit from nontraditional sources (not more than 25% total credit for any program) such as CLEP, AP, police academies, military training, prior experience, and specialized industry training.  The institution provided examples of the process used to ensure coursework and learning outcomes are comparable to its own degree programs.

 

The policy on the acceptance of transfer credit published in the Student Handbook appears to be inconsistent with the Catalog.  According to the Catalog, academic credit awarded at a regionally or Council on Occupational Education (COE) accredited institution will be accepted for transfer while college credit awarded outside these parameters will be considered after a student completes 15 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher.  According to page 188 of the Student Handbook, transfer credit for placement will only be accepted from a regionally accredited college or university. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College acknowledges the inconsistency in wording between the Student Handbook and the 2010-11 College Catalog and Student Handbook and regrets the error.  The College has corrected the inconsistency in the online version of the 2011-2012 College Catalog and Student Handbook. 

 

The updated wording in the 2011-2012 College Catalog and Student Handbook is as follows:  “A student has transferred degree-creditable, college level English or math courses with a “C” or better. Transcripts must be on file before an exception to the placement testing requirement will be approved.” This discrepancy has been corrected in the electronic version of the 2011-2012 Catalog and Student Handbook.  Because a number of the 2011-2012 Catalogs have already been printed and distributed, the updated language will appear in the second printing of the Catalog.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.4.4.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.      

2011-2012 Catalog and Student Handbook containing update

 


3.4.9    Academic support services

 

The institution provides appropriate academic support services.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution provides a broad array of appropriate academic support services to students at the Decatur and Huntsville campuses including library services, advising, testing, reading/writing/math lab support, computer technology support, tutoring, TRIO, and disability services.  Disability Services offer students adequate accommodations and enrollment services.  Tutoring and learning labs are provided for a variety of subjects and tutoring is offered 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  The library is accessible for day, evening, and distance education students.  The TRIO Program and Developmental Education Program offer extra support to enhance the academic experience.  The institution has expanded its computer technology support to include WebAdvisor, BlackBoard, and student email.  Results from the 2010 administration of the CAPP revealed high student satisfaction with laboratory support, library services, and academic advising. 

 

Although the institution has systems in place to allow distance learning students to access library services and manage registration and financial aid transactions, there was no mention of how distance learning students access other services such as academic advising.

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College provides a variety of academic support services to promote the success and welfare of the student.  Such services are designed to enhance the educational experiences of students, strengthen programs, and ensure student success.  These services are also available to distance learning students as explained in the following narrative.

 

Computer Technology Support

Calhoun has made extensive technology improvements in student support services over the last five years.  Through funds provided by a Title III Grant, the College installed WebAdvisor, an online system that allows students to register, view and complete financial aid transactions, and access academic profile information including degree audits.  The system also allows faculty to submit grades online.  A student e-mail system has been implemented to give every Calhoun student an e-mail account to facilitate efficient communication throughout the Campus community.  Calhoun installed BlackBoard, the platform for instructional communication in all web-based courses.

 

Advising Centers

Advising Center personnel assist students in selecting classes, planning schedules and programs of study, and registering for classes.  Advising personnel answer simple questions about enrollment through Facebook which is monitored daily.  Updates, which include enrollment topics, transfer procedures, and career service announcements are released periodically to students' Calhoun email accounts.

 

In addition, by request, advisors are able to conduct an advising session online through software called GoToMeeting.  Students schedule appointments either by phone or through email and send personal information (i.e., transcripts, student ID#, and test scores) to the advisor prior to the online appointment.  The advisor uses the information provided to conduct an appropriate advising session.  After the session, a follow-up email is sent directly to each student.  Sessions have been conducted with students all over the world, including Korea and Spain, using this method.

 

Other advising services provided online include the Advising Online Series of webinars hosted by an academic advisor.  These webinars detail different academic programs on campus.  Through the Advising Online Series offered with GoToMeeting software, students are able to register online and participate in a real-time group advising session.  This outreach allows the College to advise a large group of students, including distance learning students, who cannot come to campus.  The latest Advising Online Series was conducted May 2011 for Nursing and had 117 student registrants.

 

Orientation Classes

Orientation classes are designed to provide students with additional information about the College. Orientation is offered in many formats each semester, including 3 day mini-sessions, seven-week minimesters, and web courses.  Distance learning students who cannot come to campus can take the course online. The content is delivered through Blackboard.

 

ADA/Services for Special Student Populations

The ADA office maintains a web page that is available to students 24-hours per day. Students needing accommodations can communicate with the office via phone, email, or mail.

 

Tutoring

Calhoun Community College provides programs and services that assist students in obtaining and reaching their academic goals. Tutorial services are available 24 hours/day, 7 days per week through SmarThinking, an online tutorial service. Links to SmarThinking are available in Blackboard and are placed there by the instructor of the course. 

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

1.      

WebAdvisor

2.      

S.P.A.C.E. Student Email Accounts

3.      

Advising Center Facebook Page

4.      

GoToMeeting PowerPoint for Nursing Advising Online Series

5.      

Advising Online Series

6.      

ADA office

7.      

SmarThinking Tutoring Software


3.4.11  Academic program coordination

 

For each major in a degree program, the institution assigns responsibility for program coordination, as well as for curriculum development and review, to persons academically qualified in the field.  In those degree programs for which the institution does not identify a major, this requirement applies to a curricular area or concentration.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution failed to identify its academic programs and the identity of the individual assigned to coordinate each academic program.  The institution provided the name of the dean of each division along with the job description and academic qualifications of each dean.  The institution also identified “Lead Faculty” whose position responsibilities are to “work with the faculty to facilitate communication and to make recommendations about curricula issues.” It was not clear that the position responsibilities of the “Lead Faculty” are consistent with the expectations of a program coordinator. 

 

The institution needs to demonstrate that it assigns responsibility for program coordination to persons academically qualified.  It would be helpful if its evidence included a list of each of its majors in a degree program, the identity of the individual assigned responsibility for program coordination of each major, and the academic qualifications of each program coordinator. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College divides the instructional area into four divisions.  Each instructional division is overseen by a Dean who is academically qualified in one of the fields within the division.

 

Business/Computer Information Systems, Technologies, and Workforce Development

§  Business

§  Computer Science

§  Cosmetology and Barbering

§  Applied Technologies (HVAC, Electricity, Machine Tool, etc.)

§  Paralegal

§  Prison Education Program

 

Health

§  Nursing

§  Emergency Medical Services

§  Clinical Lab Technology

§  Physical Therapist Assistant

§  Surgical Technology

§  Dental Assisting

§  Fire Science

 

Humanities and Social Sciences

§  Language and Literature

§  Fine Arts

§  Social/Behavioral Sciences

§  Humanities

§  Physical Education

§  Child Development

§  Criminal Justice/Security

§  History

§  Political Science

§  Geography

§  Computer Graphics

 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences

§  Mathematics

§  Natural Sciences, including Biotechnology

 

The College places primary responsibility for the content, quality, and effectiveness of the curriculum with its faculty.  The Personnel Handbook lists curriculum design and revision as one of the functions of the instructional unit and personnel. Additionally, the College has identified faculty members who are academically qualified to make recommendations about curricula issues in each program or curricular area. To document the program coordination, as well as for curriculum development and review, the College has provided a number of examples. These examples demonstrate that the College has assigned program coordination, as well as curriculum development and review, to academically qualified faculty. In 2006, Jimmy Cantrell, Music Recording Industry, recommended the addition of 6 hours of Music Lessons (MUL) or Music (MUP) electives. In 2007, Jeff Mitchell (former program coordinator for Emergency Medical Services) recommended combining the content of Orientation 101 into EMP 191. More recent changes in EMS occurred in 2011 with the course numbering system documented by Mark Branon.  

 

Dr. Heather MacKrell, Physical Therapist Assistant Program Coordinator, provided several changes to the course requirements. Kristine Beadle, Computer Graphics Coordinator, has made several changes over the years.  Ron Norwood, Paralegal Program Coordinator, made several changes in 2009. He has been replaced by Interim Coordinator, Brian Oaks.  The most recent curricula change occurred in Design Drafting in 2010 with an addition of a concentration in 3D Design.  This change was based on the recommendation of Nina Bullock, Program Coordinator.

 

The following table lists all program coordinators and their credentials.

 

 

 

Business/CIS, Technologies, and Workforce Development Division

 

Name

Degree Program Coordinator

Credentials

Bethany Clem

Nick Agrawal

Nina Bullock

Jim Forthman

John Holley

Sandra McCully

Sue Mitchell

Tad Montgomery

Brian Oakes

Mark Rose

Collis Sims

Vacant

Dean

Computer Science

Design Drafting Technology

Process Technology

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration/Renewable Energy

Cosmetology & Barbering

Business Administration

Advanced Manufacturing/Machine Tool

Paralegal

Automation/Industrial Maintenance

Electrical Technology

Aerospace

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Hoyt Williamson

Department Chair for Prison Education

Qualifications

 

 

 

Health Division

 

Name

Degree Program Coordinator

Credentials

Bret McGill

Mark Branon

Karen Chockley

Darwin Clark-adjunct

Risa Grimme

Heather MacKrell

Angela Watkins

Grant Wilson

Dean

Allied Health/EMS

Dental Assisting

Fire Science

Clinical Lab Technician

Physical Therapy Assistant

Nursing

Surgical Technician

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

 

 

 

Humanities and Social Science Division

 

Name

Degree Program Coordinator

Credentials

Kenneth Anderson

Kristine Beadle

Gene Barnett

Suzanne Turner

Jimmy Cantrell

Will Culver

April Nunn

Nancy Keenum

Holly Powe

Isaac Sakyi-Addo

Beverly Stovall

Dean/Psychology

Computer Graphics

History/Political Science/Geography

Language and Literature

Music Industry Communications

Criminal Justice

Speech Communications

Physical Education/Health

Fine Arts

Sociology

Child Development

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

 

 

 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences Division

 

Name

Degree Program Coordinator

Credentials

Jimmy Duke

Rodney Alford

Earnest Williams

Steve Threlkeld

Dean

Mathematics - Huntsville

Mathematics - Decatur

Natural Sciences

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

Qualifications

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.4.11.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.      

The Personnel Handbook

2.      

Dean of Business, CIS, Technologies and Workforce Development Division Job Description

3.      

Dean of Health Division Job Description

4.      

Dean of Humanities and Social Science Job Description

5.      

Dean of Mathematics and Natural Sciences Division Job Description

6.      

Correspondence documenting curriculum development and review:

Mark Branon (EMS)

Dr. Heather MacKrell (PTA)

Kristine Beadle (Graphic Arts)

Ron Norwood (Paralegal)

Brian Oaks (Paralegal)

Nina Bullock (Drafting)


3.5.1    College-level competencies

 

The institution identifies college-level general education competencies and the extent to which graduates have attained them.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution identified six general education learning outcomes.  The General Education Committee is assigned responsibility to develop a plan and timeline for assessing the outcomes.  The general education assessment plan calls for assessment to be integrated into several high-enrollment, general education courses on a rotating, three-year cycle.  The implementation timeline provided identified two cohorts but lacked execution dates.  Classroom assessment consists of evaluation of specific classroom activities which are measured using a common course rubric.  The institution provided a rubric template, but did not include an example of a rubric used in any of the three courses discussed in the narrative.  The institution documented classroom assessment of all six general education competencies in a single class, ECO 231, with overlapping assessment of one general education competency in CIS 146 and another competency in MTH 112.  Although the institution obviously has general education competencies in place, and a plan to assess these competencies, the institution seems to rely heavily on assessment results of one class, ECO 231, for much of its assessment of general education.  The plan, as presented, failed to discuss the relationship of general education assessment to distance learning.

 

In addition to common departmental components for assessment, the institution also uses the CAAP and CCSSE to assess student learning outcomes.  According to the General Education Competencies assessment table, the institution uses the CAAP to assess four of the six general education competencies.  Unfortunately, the link to the 2009 CAAP results opens the institution’s 2009 CAPP (College Accountability and Performance Profile) results.  The 2010 CAAP results discuss results for only two general education competencies, critical thinking and scientific reasoning.  The institution provided its 2009 CAAP scores in relation to maximum scores, but no benchmarks and/or narrative to explain the relationship of this measure to the extent to which graduates have attained general education competencies.  CCSSE results were also provided for student self-assessment of five general education competencies. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College has identified six general education competencies that all of its graduates must demonstrate without regard to major:

·           Critical Thinking Skills

·           Quantitative Reasoning

·           Scientific Reasoning

·           Information and Computer Literacy

·           Communication Skills

·           Cultural Diversity Skills

The College uses three methods to assess these learning outcomes for all graduates: classroom activities or test items, The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) and the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP).  Both the CCSSE and the CAAP tests allow comparisons of Calhoun students’ performance against national benchmarks. The Plan for Student Success includes three Core Indicators using the CCSSE and CAAP as benchmarks.  The three Core Indicators include:

Core Indicator #3:  Raising Student Aspirations (Benchmark:  To meet or exceed the CCSSE “other large community college” cohort means for item stating, “This College contributed to your knowledge, skills, and personal development in developing clearer career goals.”)

Core Indicator #4:  Student Satisfaction Rates (Benchmark:  To meet or exceed the CCSSE “other large college” cohort national mean for satisfaction items.)

Core Indicator #9:  General Education Outcome Achievement Rates (Benchmarks: To meet or exceed national mean score on the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency and To meet or exceed the national mean score on the Community College Survey of Student Engagement for items related to Learning Outcomes.)

Evidence-Based Methods of Assessment:  Classroom Activity and CAAP

 

The original assessment plan for the learning outcomes included several high-enrollment, general education courses on a rotating, three-year cycle.  The first cohort identified in the plan began Fall 2007 and was scheduled to end Spring 2010.  The second cohort was scheduled to be implemented Fall 2010 through Spring 2013.  Due to limited faculty participation among the first cohort of classes, academic administrators made the decision not to transition to the second cohort of classes until after the SACS Reaffirmation Visit so that consistent data could be presented for the past three years. 

 

Since Fall 2007, Economics 231 has consistently evaluated all six learning outcomes using a multiple-choice exam in traditional and online courses.  Economics 231 is a high-enrollment, general education course with an average total enrollment of 496 students each fall (based on enrollment between 2008 and 2010) with an average 43 students enrolled in online courses each fall during the same time period.  The outcomes are measured using a common Pre- and Post-Test in all sections of Economics 231.  The Pre- and Post-Tests are given online using Survey Monkey and measure Critical Thinking, Cultural Literacy, Quantitative Skills, and Scientific Reasoning.  Communication Skills and Information/Computer Literacy are evaluated through student papers, essay questions, in-class presentations, etc.  Scoring is also done using a common rubric.  Mr. Jim Payne (Economics instructor and General Education Committee member) reminds all full- and part-time faculty to perform the learning outcomes Pre- and Post-Tests through memoranda at the beginning of the semester and at the end of the semester.  Mr. Payne collects the data from all instructors at the end of the semester and compiles and analyzes the data in an excel spreadsheet.  The spreadsheet is forwarded to the Office of Planning, Research and Grants.

 

To determine whether online Economics 231 students performed better or worse than traditional students, an analysis was conducted using Fall 2010 data.  The conclusion was that there was no significant difference between the scores of the distance and classroom students on the Economics 231 post test for Fall 2010.  Results and the number of students tested from Fall 2008, Fall 2009, and Fall 2010 are presented in the following table.  NOTE:  Due to the tornado outbreak on April 27 and the subsequent loss of power, Calhoun Community College was closed from April 27 – May 6, 2011 causing students to miss final exams.  Therefore, the learning outcomes test was not administered in Economics 231 during Spring Semester, 2011.

 

 

 

 

Gen Ed Competency

ECO 231 % scoring 3 or higher

Fall 2008

 

Total Tested: 484

ECO 231 % scoring 3 or higher

Fall 2009

 

Total Tested: 487

ECO 231 % scoring 3 or higher

Fall 2010

 

Total Tested: 407

Critical Thinking

92.0

88.7

 

90.7

Quantitative Reasoning

74.7

66.2

 

71.5

Scientific Reasoning

77.9

71.8

 

78.5

Information and Computer Literacy

100.0

42.1

 

75.0

Communication Skills

57.7

50.5

 

44.4

Cultural Literacy

77.1

73.2

 

77.0

All Gen Ed

77.1

61.3

 

71.2

Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) 

Calhoun administers the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) during Assessment Week which typically occurs in early March of each year.  The CAAP is given in day and evening college-level courses on the Huntsville and Decatur campuses. CAAP is used to measure and evaluate the effectiveness of the College’s general education programs.  The College began using the CAAP test in 2006 as a direct measure of student learning.  The CAAP test targets sophomore-level students in upper-level general education courses. Two test topics are administered each year to coincide with the learning outcomes.  In 2011, Mathematics and Reading were selected as the CAAP test modules. The Mathematics assessment is used to measure the general education outcome of “Quantitative Reasoning” and the Reading assessment is used to test “Communication Skills” and as supporting documentation for the College’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) entitled Academic Reading Comprehension for Success. This compares to Writing Essay and Critical Thinking modules administered in 2010. The CAAP test schedule for the College is highlighted in the following table and links to the annual reports are provided for review.  Unfortunately, due to constraints by the American College Testing (ACT) organization, it is not possible to administer the CAAP test to online students at this time.  

 

Year

Reading

Writing

Math

Critical Thinking

Scientific Reasoning

2006

X

X

X

 

 

2007

X

X

X

 

 

2008

 

X

 

X

X

2009

 

X

X

 

 

2010

 

 

 

X

X

2011

X

 

X

 

 

Indirect Method of Assessment:  The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE)

Calhoun uses the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) to gain information about effective educational practices and as an indirect measure of student learning.  CCSSE data are also used as benchmarks in The Plan for Student Success and to make improvements in College services.  The College has administered the CCSSE each spring since 2008.  Prior to CCSSE, the College administered the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Survey. The College values the CCSSE since the responses are based on students’ opinions and experiences.  CCSSE results from 2008, 2009 and 2010 are provided for review.

The breakdown of learning outcomes, the corresponding CCSSE test item, and their relevance to the general education outcomes are provided for review. 

The General Education Committee

The General Education Committee is currently reviewing the College’s learning outcomes and the assessment processes.  The Committee has met and analyzed the CAAP results for Spring 2011 with particular emphasis on the students who had completed 50 or more semester hours.  The Committee noted that in the Mathematics sections tested, the College scored above the national average (57.3 Local / 56.1 National), and the Reading results indicated the College is essentially at the national average (59.4 Local / 60.3 National). 

 

Further sampling seems to indicate that students who have accumulated 50+ semester hours and are enrolled in MTH 112 where the CAAP is administered, are much more likely to be students who began in a developmental math course than those students in the “CAAP” group.  Random samples of both groups, for example, showed 15/15 (100%) in the “CAAP+50” group that started in a developmental math course, while only 5/18 (27%) in “CAAP” group began in a developmental group! 

 

Students who have completed 50+ semester hours are most likely to achieve graduation, since they are only a semester or two away from the 64 semester hour standard for most A.S. programs.  These students have been remediated to a level very near the national average for the CAAP test during their time at Calhoun. 

 

Complete results of the 2011 analysis were noted in a memo to the Dean for Planning, Research and Grants.

Reports on the results of the national assessments are distributed to academic administrators and are posted on the College’s website.  Reports on the individual learning outcomes are maintained in the Office of Planning, Research and Grants.  In addition, each Dean from the four major academic divisions receives a report containing the student success rates in each course in his/her respective area at the end of each semester.  These reports include the general education core courses as well as discipline-specific courses. 

Graduating Student Survey

In addition to evidenced-based and nationally-normed assessments of general education competencies, Calhoun solicits the opinions of graduates through the Graduating Student Survey.  The Survey seeks input on graduating students’ educational goals, transfer information, and employment information.  An example of a recently-completed Graduating Student Survey, and summary results from the 2010 Survey are provided for review.

These combined direct and indirect methods of assessment as stated demonstrate compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.5.1.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.       

General Education Outcomes original assessment plan

2.       

Economics 231 learning outcomes

3.       

Economics 231 Common Pre- and Post Test

4.       

Economics 231 Common Rubric

5.       

Reminder Memo from Jim Payne (Beginning of semester)

6.       

Reminder Memo from Jim Payne (End of semester)

7.       

Analysis comparing online students to traditional students

8.       

Fall 2008 Results

9.       

Fall 2009 Results

10.    

Fall 2010 Results

11.    

2006 CAAP Results

12.    

2007 CAAP Results

13.    

2008 CAAP Results

14.    

2009 CAAP Results

15.    

2010 CAAP Results

16.    

2011 CAAP Results

17.    

CCSSE results from 2008

18.    

CCSSE results from 2009

19.    

CCSSE results from 2010

20.    

CCSSE relevance to the general education outcomes

21.    

2011 analysis memo from General Education Committee

22.    

2010 Graduating Student Survey

23.    

2010 Graduating Student Survey results

 


3.5.3    Undergraduate program requirements

 

The institution defines and publishes requirements for its undergraduate programs, including its general education components.  These requirements conform to commonly accepted standards and practices for degree programs.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution requires successful completion of a college-level general education curriculum to obtain an AS or A.A.S. degree.  The AS degree requires completion of a 41-42 hour general education core, and the A.A.S. degree requires the completion of an 18-29 hour general education core, both a substantial component of the degree programs.  The institution has an established Curriculum Committee to review and update program requirements, as well as an established Catalog Committee to ensure updates are published and available.  Although the institution asserts that program requirements align with the Alabama Community College System’s programs of study related to career technical education, health professions, and academic transfer, based on industry and student needs, no documentation is provided to support program alignment. 

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College offers degrees in Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) and Associate of Science (A.S.).  The requirements, including the general education component, are defined and published in the College Catalog. The Catalog is available to students by hard copy or on the college website.  These requirements also conform to commonly acceptable standards and practices for degree programs as defined by Code of Alabama, Articulation and General Studies Committee, and Alabama State Board of Education.

 

The A.S. degree is designed for those students who are planning to transfer to senior institutions. The A.S. degree is composed of 60 - 64 hours with 41 - 42 hours comprising the general education core.  The requirements conform to the approved statewide articulation agreements between all Alabama public two-year and four-year institutions as developed under the Alabama Statewide Transfer and Articulation Reporting System (STARS) and approved by the Articulation and General Studies Committee (AGSC).  This articulation network guarantees that the courses completed at Calhoun will transfer to the student’s chosen public college or university in the state of Alabama when the prescribed curriculum is followed.  Code of Alabama Section 16-5-8 establishes a statewide general studies core curriculum of 41 - 42 semester hours.  The number of required hours for an A.S. degree is also outlined in the Guidelines for State Board Policy 712.01. General requirements are outlined in the following table:


 
General Education Requirements for Associate of Science (A.S.) Degree

English Composition.............................................................. 6 credit hours

Humanities/Fine Arts/Speech............................................... 12 credit hours

Must complete 3 hours in literature

Must complete 3 hours in fine arts

Natural Science and Mathematics........................................ 11 - 12 credit hours

Must complete 3 hours at Precalculus or Finite Math level

Must complete 8 hours of Natural Sciences with lab

History, Social and Behavioral Sciences................................ 12 credit hours

Must complete 3 hours in history

Must complete at least 6 hours in remaining social/behavioral science disciplines

 

Total General Education Requirements............................... 41 - 42 credit hours

Total Pre-Professional, Pre-Major, and Elective Courses …. 19 - 23 credit hours

AS Degree Range …………………………………………………………….. 60 - 64 credit hours

 

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees are designed for those students who wish to complete two years of education at the community college level and enter the workforce. Associate of Applied Science degrees consist of 60 - 76 hours with 18 - 29 hours of general education courses as outlined in the Guidelines for State Board Policy 712.01. All A.A.S. degree programs have advisory boards made up of people from the industry or career field.  Advisory Board members serve to review curriculum and make sure the requirements are consistent with industry/career field needs.  General requirements for the A.A.S. degree are listed below.

 

General Education Requirements for Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degrees

English Composition.............................................................. 3 - 6 credit hours*

Humanities/Fine Arts/Speech............................................... 3 - 6 credit hours*

Must complete 3 hours of humanities or fine arts

Natural Science, Computer Science, and Mathematics....... 9 - 11 credit hours

Must complete 3 hours of mathematics

History, Social and Behavioral Sciences................................ 3 - 6 credit hours

*Students must complete at least 9 hours in English Composition, Humanities, Fine Arts, and Speech

 

Total General Education Requirements............................... 18 - 29 credit hours

Total Major, Technical Core, and Elective Courses …………... 19 - 23 credit hours

A.A.S. Degree Range …………………………………………………………... 60 - 76 credit hours

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.5.3.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

College Catalog

2.

Statewide articulation agreements between 2- and 4- year schools

3.

Alabama Statewide Transfer and Articulation Reporting System (STARS)

4.

Articulation and General Studies Committee (AGSC)

5.

Code of Alabama Section 16-5-8

6.

Guidelines for State Board Policy 712.01

7.

Advisory Board List for Technologies


3.7.1    Faculty competence

 

The institution employs competent faculty members qualified to accomplish the mission and goals of the institution.  When determining acceptable qualifications of its faculty, an institution gives primary consideration to the highest earned degree in the discipline.  The institution also considers competence, effectiveness, and capacity, including, as appropriate, undergraduate and graduate degrees, related work experiences in the field, professional licensure and certifications, honors and awards, continuous documented excellence in teaching, or other demonstrated competencies and achievements that contribute to effective teaching and student learning outcomes.  For all cases, the institution is responsible for justifying and documenting the qualifications of its faculty.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

After reviewing the information on the Faculty Roster, it was impossible to determine whether all faculty members are qualified to teach the courses assigned.  The institution referenced State Board Policy 605.02 as the basis by which faculty are deemed competent, but provided no guidance regarding the use of this document to determine minimum qualifications by group, by level, or by degree versus in-field requirements.  See attached Faculty Roster Worksheet at the end of this report.

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College employs competent faculty members who are qualified to accomplish the mission and goals of the institution. The College complies with not only the SACS requirements regarding faculty qualifications, but also the Alabama State Board of Education.  Section 2.10 of State Board Policy 605.02 outlines the minimum qualifications for faculty members teaching in the Alabama Community College System. Prior to employment, all faculty members must submit an application, official transcript(s), resume, and any licensures or certifications. The credentials are reviewed by all members of the search committee to ensure that minimum qualifications are met.  State Board Policy 605.02 organizes credentials according to teaching areas based on Groups A, B, or C and also align with the SACS Guidelines.

 

Group A requirements are used for instructors teaching credit courses in humanities and fine arts; social and behavioral sciences; natural sciences and mathematics; and in professional, occupational, and technical areas that are components of associate degree programs (A.S.) designed for college transfer.

 

Group A typically aligns with SACS’ guidelines associated with Faculty Credentials, which states that faculty teaching associate degree courses designed to transfer should have a Master’s Degree with 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching field.

 

Group B requirements are used for instructors teaching credit courses in professional, occupational, and technical areas not usually resulting in college transfer.  The specialized coursework is typically considered an associate’s degree with demonstrated competencies in the teaching field.

 

Group B typically aligns with SACS’s Guidelines associated with Faculty Credentials, which states that faculty teaching associate degree courses not designed to transfer should have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in the teaching field, or an associate’s degree and demonstrated competencies in the teaching discipline.

 

Group C requirements are used for instructors teaching credit courses in diploma or certificate occupational programs.

 

The College attempts to hire highly qualified faculty members. This means that in many occasions, the actual credentials for the faculty may exceed the minimum qualifications as outlined by groups B or C.  Many faculty teach in fields that have both transfer and non-transfer courses.  As a result, faculty who hold a master’s degree with 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching field would not be required to also hold a bachelor’s or an associate’s degree with in-field requirements. Some programs may not be designed to transfer (Nursing, for example).  Therefore, nursing faculty requirements are actually in Group A instead of Group B.

 

Additional Justification for Documenting Qualifications

The Off-site Committee identified several faculty members as either not having appropriate qualifications or needing additional justification.

 

Allied Health – Nursing: Although the Associate of Applied Science degree in nursing is not designed to transfer, all faculty members hold a master’s degree with at least 18 graduate semester hours in nursing. Nursing courses fall in Group A, and the 3 years work experience is not required. Each nursing faculty also holds a valid Alabama Nursing Licensure.

 

Allied Health: Valid work experience has been documented through the Faculty Credential Form and resumes. Again, for those faculty members who hold a master’s degree or higher with at least 18 graduate semester hours, the documented work experience is not necessary.

 

Business Administration: The Off-site Committee identified 28 faculty members as either not having minimum qualifications and/or the documented 3 years work experience. Fourteen of those faculty members were identified as not having 3 years work experience. However, for faculty members holding a master’s degree with at least 18 graduate semester hours in-field, the work experience is not necessary. Additional work experience has been documented for nine faculty members.

 

Fine Arts: The Committee identified six faculty members. Two of those faculty members hold a master’s degree in-field and do not need the documented work experience. For the remaining faculty members, additional documentation has been provided.

 

Language Arts, Mathematics, Natural Science and Social Science: Additional documentation has been provided to justify demonstrated competencies in the field or the College has agreed to no longer use the faculty member.

 

Technologies: The institution has provided additional documentation through the Faculty Credential Form and resumes to support the 3 years work experience.

 

A complete listing of faculty qualifications and courses taught can be found in the Faculty Rosters provided for the spring and fall semesters 2010, as required by the Commission on Colleges.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.7.1.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

Mission Statement

2.

State Board Policy 605.02

3.

Faculty Rosters


3.7.2    Faculty evaluation

 

The institution regularly evaluates the effectiveness of each faculty member in accord with published criteria regardless of contractual or tenured status.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution utilizes a three-pronged approached to full-time faculty evaluations: student evaluations, classroom observation, and supervisor evaluation.  Full-time faculty members are evaluated annually based upon criteria published in the Personnel Handbook.  Part-time faculty members are evaluated based upon two criteria: student evaluation and classroom observation.  Procedures are published in the Personnel Handbook.  However, the institution notes that part-time faculty members are evaluated only in their first semester which is inconsistent with the Personnel Handbook which states that part-time classroom evaluations are conducted in the first semester and every other year thereafter or at the discretion of the instructional officer.  Additionally, the institution did not address faculty who teach at off-campus locations or via distance education.

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College‘s Personnel Handbook correctly identifies the two-step procedure used to evaluate part-time faculty:  student evaluation and classroom observation.  Students evaluate each part-time faculty member in each course each semester utilizing the Student Assessment of Teaching and Learning Form.  Every attempt is made to conduct a Classroom Observation during the part-time faculty member’s first semester of teaching and every other year thereafter or at the discretion of the instructional officer.  The same evaluation procedure is used for all part-time faculty members, regardless of teaching location. 

 

Distance education faculty members are evaluated using the same procedures as traditional instructors.  Full-time distance education faculty members are evaluated annually using the three pronged approach – student evaluation, classroom observation, and supervisory evaluation.  Part-time distance education faculty members are evaluated by their students in the same manner as part-time instructors: in each course each semester utilizing the Student Assessment of Teaching and Learning Online Courses form.  Students complete the assessment anonymously, and results are delivered to the Division Dean and returned to the instructor after course grades are submitted.  Division Deans also have the capability to log in to any distance education course in their division and evaluate course content and delivery.

 

The College piloted a fully online faculty evaluation system during Fall 2010 utilizing a cross-section of courses from all College divisions and campuses.  The results of the pilot were reviewed in January 2011 by the President's Staff.  The pilot was deemed successful, and a contract was signed with the vendor to provide online evaluations of all courses and sections offered by the College.  The online faculty evaluation system replaced the previous paper-based evaluations completed by approximately half of the student population during any given semester.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.7.2.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

Personnel Handbook

2.

Student Assessment of Teaching and Learning Form

3.

Classroom Observation Evaluation Form

4.

Student Assessment of Teaching and Learning Online Courses form

 


3.9.3    Qualified staff

 

The institution employs qualified personnel to ensure the quality and effectiveness of its student affairs program.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution provided a list of student affairs personnel that included titles and responsibilities.  The information included in columns four (Educational Qualifications) and five (Profession Experience) was insufficient to assess the qualifications of any of the student affairs personnel.  Information such as educational qualifications of the student affairs personnel with a sufficient level of detail to establish the relationship between the individual’s position responsibilities and academic qualifications and staff member’s professional experience in the area of student support services that qualifies the individual to carry out his or her responsibilities would have been helpful.

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

Calhoun Community College’s Student Success Unit is divided into two divisions: Student Affairs and Enrollment Management. Each division is supervised by a Dean or an Associate Dean who reports to the Vice President of Instruction and Student Success.

 

The Student Affairs Division is composed of Athletics, Services to Special Populations, Student Activities, Student Support Services, and Upward Bound.  The Division is supervised by the Dean of Student Affairs, Dr. Kermit Carter, and has eleven well-qualified, full-time employees.  Dr. Carter has been an administrator in student services since 1971.  His experience includes such titles as assistant dean, assistant coordinator, coordinator, associate dean, dean, and vice president.

 

The Enrollment Management Division is composed of admissions and records, advising, career services, orientation, recruitment, and placement testing. The Division has 31 full-time employees and is supervised by the Associate Dean of Enrollment Management and College Registrar, Dr. Dan Opalewski.  Dr. Opalewski has been in administration since 1986 serving as Director of Occupational Counseling and Placement, Dean of Student Affairs, Vice President for Students Services and Enrollment Management, Dean of Enrollment Management/Registrar, and Associate Dean of Enrollment Management/Registrar. To assist the Associate Dean, the Division also has a coordinator and an assistant director. The Assistant Director of Admissions, Amy Woolfolk, has a Master of Science in Community Counseling with four years experience. She has worked in recruiting, student activities, enrollment management, and admissions and records. The Coordinator of Enrollment Management Services, Samantha Nelson, has a Master of Education in Adult and Higher Education.  She has almost six years of supervisory experience as Executive Supervisor for Women’s Ministries, Tutoring and Testing Center Manager, and Coordinator of Enrollment Management. She has also served as an advisor/recruiter and case manager. 

 

The Student Success Unit has 42 well-qualified personnel on the Decatur and Huntsville campuses dedicated to meeting students’ needs.  To ensure the quality, effectiveness, and consistency of the programs between locations, many of the Student Success personnel provide services on both the Decatur and Huntsville campuses. All personnel are recruited and selected in accordance with the College’s hiring practices.  After being employed, they are also encouraged to participate in continuing education and professional development activities.  The Student Affairs template provides a list of Student Success personnel, along with titles, responsibilities, educational qualifications, and professional experience. The responsibilities are linked to the job descriptions, while the educational qualifications are linked to the transcripts. Additional information is also provided under professional experiences, which is linked to employee resumes.  The additional information should provide more detail in establishing a relationship between responsibilities and qualifications and experiences.

 

It should be noted that the Student Financial Services Department reports to the Dean for Business and Finance and is not part of the Student Success unit.  However, Financial Aid personnel are included on the Student Affairs Template to provide evidence of compliance.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.9.3.

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

Student Affairs Organization Chart

2.

Enrollment Management Division Organization Chart

3.

Student Affairs template

 


4.6       Recruitment materials

 

Recruitment materials and presentations accurately represent the institution’s practices and policies.

 

OFF-SITE COMMITTEE COMMENTS

 

The institution failed to demonstrate that all recruitment materials accurately portray the institution’s practices and policies.  Although materials such as the Viewbook, Future Students webpage include information that accurately reflect the mission of the institution and its practices and policies, the same could not be said for all of the institution’s webpages.  The Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program webpage, for instance, asserts that “The Physical Therapist Assistant Program at Calhoun Community College is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE),” yet according to CAPTE, the Calhoun Community College PTA program is a candidate for accreditation.  According to CAPTE, “Candidacy status indicates that a program is making satisfactory progress toward compliance with accreditation criteria, but it does not assure that a program will achieve accreditation.”

 

CALHOUN COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESPONSE

 

The Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Program at Calhoun Community College received full accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) on April 19, 2011, and the PTA Website was updated accordingly.  The Compliance Certification document was mailed on March 15, 2011 while the College was considered in “Candidacy Status.”  The Off-Site Review Team met in Atlanta May 2011.  The difference in the timing of the official notification from CAPTE and the review of the Off-Site Team explains the inconsistency. 

 

A complete timeline of the CAPTE accreditation process is outlined below:

 

     November 23, 2010:          Self study report sent to CAPTE

 

     January 23-26, 2011:         On-site review by CAPTE team at Calhoun College

 

     April 19, 2011:                   PTA program notified by phone and certificate mailed notifying of official accreditation

 

     April 19, 2011:                   Request sent to Calhoun College’s web master to update website to reflect accreditation status.

 

Calhoun Community College respectfully finds that it is in compliance with Federal Requirement 4.6.

 

 

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

Supporting Document

 

Description

1.

CAPTE Certificate of Accreditation